The Wasa of 1638 (MA737)

$1,199.99

The Wasa of 1638 was the most ornately decorated vessel of her time. Mantua’s kit also outshines all others in the quality and quantity of its ornamentation. Intricate bronze parts are cast one piece at a time in wax molds

SKU: MA737 Categories: , Tags: ,

Description

The Wasa of 1638 was the most ornately decorated vessel of her time.

Vasa or Wasa; is a retired Swedish warship built between 1626 and 1628. The ship foundered after sailing about 1,300 m (1,400 yd) into its maiden voyage on 10 August 1628. It fell into obscurity after most of her valuable bronze cannons were salvaged in the 17th century until it was located again in the late 1950s in a busy shipping lane just outside the Stockholm harbor. The ship was salvaged with a largely intact hull in 1961. It was housed in a temporary museum called Wasavarvet (‘The Wasa Shipyard’) until 1988 and then moved permanently to the Vasa Museum in the Royal National City Park in Stockholm. The ship is one of Sweden’s most popular tourist attractions and has been seen by over 35 million visitors since 1961. Since her recovery, Vasa has become a widely recognized symbol of the Swedish ‘great power period’.

The ship was built on the orders of the King of Sweden Gustavus Adolphus as part of the military expansion he initiated in a war with Poland-Lithuania (1621–1629). It was constructed at the navy yard in Stockholm under a contract with private entrepreneurs in 1626–1627 and armed primarily with bronze cannons cast in Stockholm specifically for the ship. Richly decorated as a symbol of the king’s ambitions for Sweden and himself, upon completion it was one of the most powerfully armed vessels in the world. However, Vasa was dangerously unstable and top-heavy with too much weight in the upper structure of the hull. Despite this lack of stability it was ordered to sea and foundered only a few minutes after encountering a wind stronger than a breeze.

The order to sail was the result of a combination of factors. The king, who was leading the army in Poland at the time of her maiden voyage, was impatient to see her take up her station as flagship of the reserve squadron at Älvsnabben in the Stockholm Archipelago. At the same time the king’s subordinates lacked the political courage to openly discuss the ship’s problems or to have the maiden voyage postponed. An inquiry was organized by the Swedish Privy Council to find those responsible for the disaster, but in the end no one was punished.

During the 1961 recovery, thousands of artifacts and the remains of at least 15 people were found in and around the Vasa’s hull by marine archaeologists. Among the many items found were clothing, weapons, cannons, tools, coins, cutlery, food, drink and six of the ten sails. The artifacts and the ship herself have provided scholars with invaluable insights into details of naval warfare, shipbuilding techniques and everyday life in early 17th-century Sweden.

Mantua’s kit also outshines all others in the quality and quantity of its ornamentation. Intricate bronze parts are cast one piece at a time in wax molds. You’ll find 64 cannon, figurehead, lanterns and hundreds of other authentically detailed decorations. Plank-on-bulkhead construction uses laser cut wooden parts for a perfect fit. Five and six millimeter plywood guarantees a sturdy hull. Double planking is done with individual limewood and walnut strips and eight diameters of walnut dowels provide the proper scale and size for masts and yards. Hardwood and brass fittings, silk flags, six diameters of cotton rigging and photo-etched brass nameplate are all supplied. Six double sided sheets of plans, instruction book and a large color poster (suitable for framing) assist in building your masterpiece – -a faithful replica of the original Wasa on view in the Stockholm Naval Museum. You can find the corresponding paint set here

Length 46 1/2″ / Scale 1:60.

Additional information

Weight 20 lbs